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Italeri1/35 Crusader Mk II

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Richard Foenander11/10/2017 17:19:00
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3586 forum posts
4517 photos

Hi David,

Will look in on this as I have one of these bought over two years back by chance in Sydney. I'll find a seat in the back row.

Cheers,

Richard

John Race11/10/2017 19:26:10
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5897 forum posts
1273 photos

David.

I'll sit with my mate Scottie, I no nothing about English tankssad, but I will at the end of this teeth 2

John.

David Hewkin11/10/2017 23:01:31
211 forum posts
328 photos

Hey guys, this seems to have attracted quite a little following! Glad to have you along.

Progress a little slow at present, but I'll post some photos tomorrow.

I have decided to give the mk iii etch from Eduard a try especially for some of the interior turret details so am waiting for this to turn up.

As I cannot use an airbrush until we move back home I'll be creating sub assemblies where possible ready for a quick squirt of a suitable sandy colour prior to the grand assembly!

I'm also going to try painting my first 1/35 figure in about 35 years, so that should be interesting - I'll keep the censors pen handy as language could turn a little blue 😉

David

David Hewkin12/10/2017 09:19:39
211 forum posts
328 photos

As promised, a quick update on progress so far.

The kit as a whole is pretty nicely cast - mouldings are crisp and there is no evidence of warping. However there is consistent slight misalignment of the mold tool creating raised joints on many pieces. Its not awful but requires careful cleaning especially on rounded items.

You can see this on the wheels:

wheels - flash.jpg

5 wheels each side, 10 sets, all ready for undercaoting:

wheels completed.jpg

The wheels attach to the hull tub via axles protruding from the suspension arms. You can see more ridges on these, but as they are not visible once the outer plate is in place its not an issue. If they were visible avoiding flat spots would be difficult:

suspension arms with flash.jpg

The tub:

tub awaiting suspension arms.jpg

With suspension attached:

tub with suspension arms.jpg

Thats it for now. Cleaning up the ridges is time consuming, but once the wheels and suspension are out of the way it should be a pretty straight forward build.

Finally, I will be practising my painting on this chap from the Tamiya Universal Carrier kit:

1-35 figure.jpg

Its not the greatest casting, but will do for practising on.

David

Dave S 413/10/2017 12:15:53
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341 forum posts
50 photos

They're under starter's orders... And they're away!

Enjoy the journey.

DS

John Race13/10/2017 12:50:38
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5897 forum posts
1273 photos

Nice startthumbs up Dave.

John.

Steve Jones 1214/10/2017 14:37:05
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3342 forum posts
8510 photos

David

Just arrived in time. Great to see a piece of British armour being done. Off to a nice clean steady start. Good luck with the rest

Steve

David Hewkin16/10/2017 19:24:11
211 forum posts
328 photos

Richard, good to have you along.

John, I'll do my best to increase your knowledge dont know

Dave, I'm off yes, but it will be at tortoise speed.

Steve, welcome.

Not much progress over the weekend. I did lots of sanding and prep work, but not on anything enjoyable - as we get close to moving back in to our house I am getting all the doors painted before the carpets get laid. As these were unpainted before the fire they dont get to be painted as part of the 're-instatement' crying

My etch turned up, which should help with some detailing of the turret interior, as it only cost a fiver I'm not too worried about using it all. In fact a lot of PE is far too thin and not appropriate to replace the plastic parts. Where necessary I will scratch using plastic card.

First up I trimmed the front fenders to remove the strange step Italeri have incorporated. I read somewhere it is because the idler wheel is too large and the step is necessary for the track to fit. You can see it more clearly in the second pic - the red outline shows the step after removal.

front fenders showing where to cut.jpg

front fender showing trimming process.jpg

The trimmed items:

front fenders trimmed.jpg

There are sink marks on the inside, but I don't think they will be visible once the shields and wheels are fitted.

The bits for the drivers position were cleaned up. The vision port seen on the left hand piece is a bit crude. I might drill this out and add some clear plastic sheet. The arrows to the right show the hinges for the hatch. These need to be rounded off slightly as they are just square tabs at the moment.

parts of drivers position.jpg

The side plates containing the suspension are attached to the hull top. There are several injection points here that prevent a flush joint so need to be carefully scraped off:

hull top underside.jpg

Finally a little work on the figure. His torso has been attached to his legs, and I have cleaned up all the seams. On closer inspection he has a rather poorly moulded lanyard which will be removed. I also had to cut heels into his boots as they were completely flat:

figure torso showing lanyard.jpg

I'm not sure that his socks are accurate though - can anyone advise please?

More trimming to do, and trying to decide how much to do with the turret - need to determine what will be visible.

Thanks for watching.

David

Peter Lynch 217/10/2017 23:56:03
65 forum posts

David,

I am no expert on British Army stockings circa 1942 (I'll be the first to admit that) but some years ago I did spend a while thinking about how the bulky stockinged legs of the Italeri tanker that comes with the the Crusader III (I seem to remember) could be made more convincing. Italeri and Tamiya have tried to reproduce the ribbing seen in British stockings but the knitted ribs seem overscale. They are too thick and consequently there are too few of them: there should be two or 3 dozen ribs, not the few engraved by Italeri and Tamiya, I surmise? In my opinion they should be like very subtle "ridges". I thought that if the existing pattern was rubbed down until barely visible, then a very sharp scalpel was dragged alongside each groove, it would give a suggestion of knitted stockings without looking as if he had tubes around his legs! I tried, but grew bored and never finished. Later I wondered if some textured paper (such as very thin paper folded like a concertina, then opened out) was glued over each stocking, this might look like knitted ribbed stockings. Obviously I "overthought the problem", because later I realised that painting fine greyish lines on a buff colour undercoat or drawing them in with a fine tipped pen might also look convincing while being quicker to do. I read a book some years ago produced by Nuffield (they built the Crusader engine, I think) in which they described the major planning they employed in designing it: examples of the Crusader were even sent to the North African theatre, driven for thousands of miles and then returned to Britain to examine the effects of wear: that sounds like very in-depth engineering. So I am still puzzled as to why the Crusader's mechanical performance is usually described as not living up to expectations. I suppose what engineers design doesn't always stand up to the realities of war, especially given the more basic standards of 1940s mechanical engineering.

Peter

Peter Lynch 217/10/2017 23:56:04
65 forum posts

David,

I am no expert on British Army stockings circa 1942 (I'll be the first to admit that) but some years ago I did spend a while thinking about how the bulky stockinged legs of the Italeri tanker that comes with the the Crusader III (I seem to remember) could be made more convincing. Italeri and Tamiya have tried to reproduce the ribbing seen in British stockings but the knitted ribs seem overscale. They are too thick and consequently there are too few of them: there should be two or 3 dozen ribs, not the few engraved by Italeri and Tamiya, I surmise? In my opinion they should be like very subtle "ridges". I thought that if the existing pattern was rubbed down until barely visible, then a very sharp scalpel was dragged alongside each groove, it would give a suggestion of knitted stockings without looking as if he had tubes around his legs! I tried, but grew bored and never finished. Later I wondered if some textured paper (such as very thin paper folded like a concertina, then opened out) was glued over each stocking, this might look like knitted ribbed stockings. Obviously I "overthought the problem", because later I realised that painting fine greyish lines on a buff colour undercoat or drawing them in with a fine tipped pen might also look convincing while being quicker to do. I read a book some years ago produced by Nuffield (they built the Crusader engine, I think) in which they described the major planning they employed in designing it: examples of the Crusader were even sent to the North African theatre, driven for thousands of miles and then returned to Britain to examine the effects of wear: that sounds like very in-depth engineering. So I am still puzzled as to why the Crusader's mechanical performance is usually described as not living up to expectations. I suppose what engineers design doesn't always stand up to the realities of war, especially given the more basic standards of 1940s mechanical engineering.

Peter

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